Finding finances with returning fundraisers

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By Maddie Pulliam, Staff Reporter Krispy Kreme doughnuts and potted plants have taken over the main lobby as Conestoga’s clubs set up fundraisers. Nearly every week for the past few months, a student group has organized a fundraiser — from doughnut sales to toy drives. Now that COVID-19 restrictions have eased and bake sales are...

By Maddie Pulliam, Staff Reporter

Krispy Kreme doughnuts and potted plants have taken over the main lobby as Conestoga’s clubs set up fundraisers. Nearly every week for the past few months, a student group has organized a fundraiser — from doughnut sales to toy drives. Now that COVID-19 restrictions have eased and bake sales are allowed once again, clubs are taking advantage of the opportunity and raising money for their specific causes.

“Fundraising is important because it helps us give back. I think it doesn’t take a lot to organize a fundraiser and get donations, but it can mean a lot to people in the end,” said junior and president of Caring for Kids at CHOP Club Peyton Reidenbach.

Krispy Kreme doughnut sales have been very successful this year, and many clubs are using this sales tactic. However, not all clubs are following suit — and sometimes, to their benefit. Junior and president of Horticulture Club Brian Harrity hosted one of the most popular fundraisers of the year according to other club presidents and students. His club grew their own plants and then sold them, along with Krispy Kreme doughnuts, during the school day. Students walked around the school with miniature flowers and succulents in support of the club.

“People always want to get their hands on some plants, and it was nice to see that people actually enjoy what we plant,” Harrity said.

Another popular fundraiser was the Mock Trial Club’s cookie dough sale. This fundraiser sold scoops of cookie dough throughout the day, although, senior and club president, Aishwarya Gowrishankar, originally underestimated the popularity of the sale. Gowrishankar had to drive to Target during her lunch period to restock the cookie dough supply and continue the sale. The fundraiser sold around 200 cups of cookie dough throughout the day and raised $230 in profit for the club to continue to participate in mock trials against other schools next year. Gowrishankar was satisfied with the success of her club’s sale and believes that fundraising for the benefit of other people is very important.

“I feel like fundraising is something that can draw a lot of attention to certain issues and things that people are trying to bring light to,” Gowrishankar said. “I think it’s a good way for people to give money to someone while also receiving something in return. It’s a two-way street.”


Maddie Pulliam can be reached at [email protected]

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