Unity Fair a success despite pandemic conditions

Students+participate+in+golf+during+the+annual+Unity+Fair.+Various+activities%2C+both+in-person+and+virtual%2C+were+available+throughout+the+day.+

Students participate in golf during the annual Unity Fair. Various activities, both in-person and virtual, were available throughout the day.

By Abby Bagby, Staff Reporter

From minigolf to dunk tanks, numerous activities and games took place at the annual Unity Fair on May 28. The goal of the event was to bring the school community together and offer a fun break from regularly scheduled classes before the end of the school year. 

This year, activities including badminton, volleyball, table tennis and a teacher dunk tank were available to students. Freshman Greta Steege enjoyed the event because it enabled her to connect with her peers, despite social distancing requirements.

“It was just a nice day to kind of step back and relax and be like, ‘Oh, the school year is almost here.’ It was a good social event, considering this year where I really haven’t seen any people other than people in my classes, so I was able to see people I wouldn’t normally see at school,” Steege said.

Clubs such as the Asian American Culture Club (AACC) also offered activities for students to take part in, including a viewing of the movie “Minari”, a part of the AACC’s planned activities for Asian American Pacific Islander Month. Junior Ruhri Lee appreciated this opportunity for students to learn about different cultures.

“I think it’s especially important because it’s an opportunity for all students of all backgrounds to acknowledge and embrace all other cultures and races and ethnicities,” Lee said. “It’s such a valuable moment for everyone to take time and acknowledge.”

Freshman Jordan Jacoel, appreciated the activities provided throughout the day to accommodate virtual students who were unable to participate at the in-person fair.

“It was really great that the school was able to have stuff for the virtual people and I really appreciated it. I hope that others did too. It was a great experience; I think it was fun (to participate virtually). I can’t wait to do it next year when I’m in person,” Jacoel said.

Steege believes that the social aspect of the Unity Fair was also beneficial for many students’ mental health.

“I think (the Fair) is important, because I know there are definitely people that have struggled with mental health over this time,” Steege said. “Even just to get everybody together and see one school event that actually feels semi-normal was good.”


Abby Bagby can be reached at [email protected]