Education Committee sleep study: More stress or more sleep?

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I’ve modified my current daily schedule to show the Education Committee the impact of a new start time on our sleep levels.

By Avery Maslowsky, Co-Editor-in-Chief

Hello, my name is Avery and I got three hours of sleep last night.

It was midnight when I realized I had made the mistake of putting off my weekend homework. The pile of notes and study guides stared blankly at me, awaiting completion. I kissed my pillow goodbye and sat down at my desk, not returning until quarter past two.

This is how it goes weekend and weekday alike. I’m a repeat offender. And I’m not alone. The bragging culture at Conestoga is based on one’s sleep schedule:

“You got two hours of sleep last night? That’s great! I pulled an all-nighter again.”

But, my fellow students, there is no longer a need to fret, as the TESD Education Committee confirmed on Nov. 8 that it would conduct a “sleep study” of students. Now, before you go and attack the board for studying sleep deprivation of ’Stoga — a problem we already know exists — the study will look to best accommodate “the sleep needs” of our student body. However, instead of changing the curriculum or looking to minimize the ’Stoga stress we face on a day-to-day basis, they will be looking at school start times.

The Committee said that within the Central League, Conestoga currently has the earliest start time. After its committee recently conducted an evaluation of start time, Radnor High School was recommended to start at 8:30 a.m., 55 minutes later than its previous start time.

But despite my time at Conestoga dwindling to an end, the excitement of a possible new start time for my fellow students is overwhelming. Therefore, I’ve modified my current daily schedule to show the Committee the impact of a new start time on our sleep levels.

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